[QODLink]
Europe

Turkey bans YouTube over security leak

Move follows release of audio file on YouTube, purporting to be of security meeting about military action in Syria.

Last updated: 27 Mar 2014 19:32
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
The move against YouTube came a day after a court ordered a suspension of the Twitter ban [Reuters]

Turkey has banned video-sharing website YouTube, having blocked Twitter a week earlier, after both were used to spread audio recordings damaging to the government, local media reported.

The move came hours after the release of an audio file on YouTube, purporting to be of a security meeting in which top government, military and spy officials discuss a possible scenario for military action inside Syria.

Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan Erdogan on Thursday slammed political opponents he said had leaked the audio tape.

"They have leaked something on YouTube today," he told a campaign rally ahead of crucial local elections Sunday, following the latest in a series of damaging social media leaks.

"It was a meeting on our national security ... It is a vile, cowardly, immoral act. We will go into their caves. Who are you serving by eavesdropping?"

The move against YouTube came a day after a court ordered a suspension of the Twitter ban.

The foreign ministry described the latest leak as "espionage" against the country's national security.

It added that it was a "natural practice" by the state to discuss how to protect Turkish property from "terrorist elements" but added that some part of the conversation had been "distorted".

Erdogan, whose party faces key local elections on Sunday, has been dogged by a string of leaks, including apparent wire taps suggesting a major corruption scandal, which have gone viral on Twitter and other social media platforms.

238

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.