[QODLink]
Europe

Higgs and Englert win Nobel physics prize

British and Belgian scientists receive prize for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson, or "God particle".

Last Modified: 08 Oct 2013 13:02
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
The Higgs Boson is central to particle physics that describes how the world is constructed, the Nobel jury said [AFP]

Britain's Peter Higgs and Belgium's Francois Englert won the 2013 Nobel prize for physics for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson - the particle key to explaining why elementary matter has mass - the award-giving body said.

The two scientists will share the 8 million Swedish crown ($1.25 million) prize after their theoretical work was finally justified by experiments at the CERN research centre's gigantic particle collider.

"The awarded theory is a central part of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes how the world is constructed," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement on Tuesday.

"According to the Standard Model, everything, from flowers and people to stars and planets, consists of just a few building blocks: matter particles."

Physics was the second of this year's crop of the Nobels prizes. The prizes were first awarded in 1901 to honour achievements in science, literature and peace in accordance with the will of dynamite inventor and business tycoon Alfred Nobel.

On Monday, the Americans James Rothman and Randy Schekman and German-born Thomas Sudhof were awarded the Nobel Medicine Prize for their groundbreaking work on how the cell organises its transport system.

The announcements of Nobel laureates will continue this week and next with chemistry, literature and peace. Each prize is worth $1.2m.

Established by the Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, the Nobel Prizes have been handed out by award committees in Stockholm and Oslo since 1901.

The winners always receive their awards on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death in 1896.

255

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.