[QODLink]
Europe
UK men sentenced for 1993 'racist' murder
Judge calls Stephen Lawrence murder a "terrible and evil crime", and sentences two men to minimums of 15 and 14 years.
Last Modified: 04 Jan 2012 18:37

Two British men have been given the life sentences for the 1993 murder of a black teenager. They were convicted by a British jury on Tuesday after a three-day deliberation.

Gary Dobson, 36, was given a 15-year and two month prison term and David Norris, 35, was given 14 years and three months on Wednesday, for stabbing to death Stephen Lawrence.

The men were sentenced according to British law at the time of the killing, and they were given sentences according to their age at the time.

Judge Colman Treacy told the Old Bailey court in London it was a "terrible and evil crime", adding that the pair would have faced longer sentences except for the fact that they were teenagers when the murder happened.

"A totally innocent 18-year-old youth on the threshold of a promising life was brutally cut down in the street in front of eye witnesses by a racist, thuggish gang," Treacy said.

Lawrence was stabbed to death at a bus stop in Eltham, southeast London, in April 1993 by a group of white teenagers.

Treacy said Lawrence was killed "for no other reason than racial hatred".

"You were both members of that gang. I have no doubt at all that you fully subscribed to its views and attitudes," he said on Wednesday.

Race relations

Britain's top police officer, Scotland Yard Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe, said shortly before the sentences were passed that "the other people involved in the murder of Stephen Lawrence should not rest easily in their beds".

Dobson (L) and Norris were sentenced in a murder case that exposed "institutional racism" [Reuters]

The Stephen Lawrence case changed race relations in Britain, after a 1999 report by senior judge William Macpherson said the murder had exposed "institutional racism" in the police force and also accused officers of incompetence and a failure of leadership.

Al Jazeera's Jonah Hull said that Eighteen years after Lawrence's death, "problems still remain" in the UK government and policing structure.

"Studies suggest that Blacks are eight times more likely to be stopped and searched 'at random' on the streets than whites," our correspondent said from London.

The Lawrence case also helped end the judicial doctrine of double jeopardy, which had previously prevented suspects from being tried twice for the same crime.

One of the defendants, Dobson, had been acquitted of the murder in 1996 when a private prosecution, brought by the teenager's parents, fell apart.

The Court of Appeal quashed that acquittal in May 2011 and said Dobson could stand trial again, a decision made possible after double jeopardy was scrapped in 2005.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
The past isn't far away for a people exiled from Crimea by Russia and the decades it took to get home.
New report highlights plight of domestic helpers in the United Kingdom, with critics comparing it to kefala system.
join our mailing list