[QODLink]
Europe
Norway convicts two in 'al-Qaeda' plot
First case with international links tried under country's anti-terrorism laws, which require proof of conspiracy.
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2012 03:05
Judge Oddmund Svarteberg said the planned attack was coordinated with al-Qaeda [Reuters]

A Norwegian court has found two men guilty of involvement in an alleged al-Qaeda plot to attack a Danish newspaper that carried a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad.

Investigators say the three men, who were arrested in July 2010, were linked to a thwarted al-Qaeda plot against the New York subway system and a shopping mall Manchester, England, in 2009.

The Oslo court on Monday sentenced Mikael Davud, a Nowergian of Chinese origin who was accused of leading the plot, to seven years in prison and co-defendant Shawan Sadek Saeed Bujak, an Iraqi Kurd, to three and a half years.

A third defendant, David Jakobsen, an Uzbek with Norwegian residency, was acquitted of terror charges. Jakobsen was convicted of a lesser explosives charge and sentenced to four months, which he has already served.

It was the first case with international links tried under Norway's anti-terrorism laws, which require proof of a conspiracy between two or more people. The case was also Norway's first high-profile terror investigation since July when a man killed 77 people in a bomb and shooting massacre.

The three men on Monday made some admissions but pleaded innocent to terror conspiracy charges and rejected any links to al-Qaeda.

Judge Oddmund Svarteberg said the court found that Davud, a Chinese Muslim, "planned the attack together with al-Qaeda."

Bujak was deeply involved in the preparations, but it could not be proved that he was aware of Davud's contacts with al-Qaeda, the judge said.

Prosecutors said the Norwegian cell first wanted to attack Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, whose 12 cartoons of Muhammad sparked furious protests in Muslim countries in 2006, and then changed plans to seek to murder one of the cartoonists instead.

Davud denied he took orders from al-Qaeda, saying he was planning a solo raid against the Chinese Embassy in Oslo. He said he wanted revenge for Beijing's oppression of Uighurs, a Muslim minority in western China.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
join our mailing list