[QODLink]
Europe
Three women receive Nobel Peace Prize
Liberia's president, a fellow Liberian and a Yemeni activist accept 2011 prize at Oslo ceremony.
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2011 13:21
Yemeni activist Karman won the prize for her work in the movement against President Ali Abdullah Saleh [AFP]

Three women who have fought against injustice, dictatorships and sexual violence in Liberia and Yemen have received the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo, the Norwegian capital.

Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, compatriot Leymah Gbowee and Tawakul Karman of Yemen collected their diplomas and medals at Oslo's city hall on Saturday.

Thorbjoern Jagland, the chairman of the Nobel peace prize committee, said that the three women represented the struggle for "human rights in general and of women for equality and peace in particular".

Jagland said that the prize should serve as a warning to dictators in countries such as Yemen and Syria that their days are numbered.

"The leaders in Yemen and Syria who murder their people to retain their own power should take note of the following: mankind's quest for freedom and human rights can never stop," he said in comments before giving the prize to the three laureates.

"No dictator can in the long run find shelter from this wind of history. It was this wind which led people to crawl up onto the Berlin Wall and tear it down. It is the wind that is now blowing in the Arab world," he said.

"[Yemeni] President [Ali Abdullah] Saleh was not able and [Syrian] President [Bashar] al-Assad in Syria will not be able
to resist the people's demand for freedom and human rights," he insisted.

The three laureates, he said, represented each in their way "the most important motive forces for change in today's world, the struggle for human rights in general and the struggle of women for equality and peace in particular."

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.