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Norway gunman presents list of demands
Anders Breivik tells his lawyer that he wants sitting government to resign and a Japanese psychiatrist to examine him.
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2011 18:59
The majority of the victims were attending a youth summer camp organised by the ruling party [Reuters] 

Anders Behring Breivik, the man behind last month's deadly twin attacks in Norway, has presented a long list of "unrealistic" demands, including the resignation of the government, his defence lawyer says.

Geir Lippestad said on Tuesday that Breivik also wants his mental condition to be investigated by Japanese specialists.

One list of demands consists of requests common among inmates such as for cigarettes and civilian clothing, Lippestad told the AP news agency by telephone.

The other is "unrealistic, far, far from the real world and shows he doesn't know how society works".

"They are completely impossible to fulfill," Lippestad said, adding that although Breivik has agreed to be examined by local psychiatrists, he also wants to be investigated by Japanese specialists.

"He claims the Japanese understand the idea and values of honour and that a Japanese [specialist] would understand him a lot better than any European would."

Lippestad said Breivik links his second list of demands to his willingness to share information about two other alleged terrorist cells that Breivik has mentioned during questioning.

Two Norwegian psychiatrists are due to evaluate the mental state of the 32-year-old who has claimed responsibility for the July 22 attacks that killed 77 people, the deadliest assault on the Nordic country since World War II.

Breivik bombed government offices in Oslo, killing eight people, before going on an 80-minute shooting rampage on the nearby island of Utoeya, where the ruling Labour Party was holding a youth summer camp, killing another 69 people, most of them teenagers.

He claims he carried out the attacks as part of a network of modern-day crusaders - the Knights Templar - to launch a revolution against a Europe spoiled by Muslim immigration.

Breivik says there are other cells ready to strike, but investigators say they have found no signs of a larger conspiracy.

However, officials say they are searching his computer and mobile phone records for any signs of contact with other right-wing extremists who may have helped or influenced him.

Psychiatrists' recommendation

Norwegian psychiatrists are set to make their recommendation by November 1 on whether Breivik is sane enough to be tried for the attacks that also left dozens of people injured.

Thomas Hegghammer, a Norwegian expert on terrorism and Islamic extremism, told the AFP news agency in a recent interview that Breivik's 1,500-page manifesto detailing his "crusade" against a "Muslim invasion" of Europe, showed he was fascinated by the Japanese and Korean cultures.

Initial information available about Breivik's reasoning and personality suggested he was probably sane enough to be held accountable for his actions, the AFP said, citing several psychiatrists.

The psychiatrists' assessment, it said, means the killer could be tried and sentenced to prison instead of being locked up in a mental institution.

According to existing laws, Breivik could be jailed for up to 21 years if found guilty of terrorism.

But the sentence could be stretched to 30 years if he is also found guilty of crimes against humanity.

Meanwhile, the leader of Norway's right-wing Progress Party said the anti-Muslim views of Breivik, a former member of the party, were "perversely unique" and were not in any way linked to her party.

Siv Jensen told AP on Tuesday that Breivik had kept a low profile and never revealed his murderous plans while he was a member of the party until 2006.

"It was impossible for us to foresee at the time. He obviously changed in recent years without anyone knowing," she said.

Jensen says she resents being linked to Breivik's views, noting he condemns "all political parties in Norway - mine included - because he feels that we are all responsible for what he feels is the wrong development of Norway and Europe".

Source:
Agencies
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