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Singer on trial for 'spreading HIV'
Germany's Nadja Benaissa is accused of exposing partners to the virus that causes Aids.
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2010 12:22 GMT
Nadja Benaissa is accused of causing bodily harm by exposing partners to HIV [AFP]

A German singer has admitted that she failed to tell a number of sexual partners that she had HIV, the virus that leads to Aids, during a trial on Monday.

Nadja Benaissa, a member of the girl-band No Angels, is alleged to have infected a man with the virus in 2004.

"I am so sorry," the 28-year-old told a court in Darmstadt near Frankfurt, where she is on trial accused of causing bodily harm by having unprotected sex despite knowing she carried HIV.

Benaissa denied intending to infect anyone with it.

"No way did I want my partner to be infected," she said.

According to the charge sheet, Benaissa had sex on five occasions between 2000 and 2004 with three people and did not tell them she was infected, even though she had known about it since 1999.

One of the three had since been confirmed as being infected with the HIV virus, which causes Aids, prosecutors had said in February.

Benaissa was arrested in April 2009 and kept in custody for 10 days - a move that a German Aids awareness group criticised as disproportionate.

If convicted she faces between six months and 10 years in prison.

A verdict is due on on August 26.

Source:
Agencies
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