Nato discusses Afghan exit

Support for Afghan forces on the agenda as ministers meet to discuss withdrawal plans.

    An increase in trainers for Afghan security forces
    was a point of issue for the meeting [AFP]

    "Where it occurs, the transition must be not just sustainable but irreversible," he said.

    At the opening of the talks on Thursday, Rasmussen said: "The future of this mission is clear and visible: more Afghan capability and more Afghan leadership."

    "The Afghan government is taking more responsibility for running the country. We're preparing to begin the process of handing over leadership, where conditions allow, back to the Afghan people," he said.

    "Increasingly this year the momentum will be ours."

    Committment

    The Nato chief said that an additional 450 trainers were needed for Afghan security forfces, even though there has been some increase in recent months.

    In depth

      Video: Interview with US commander in Helmand
      Focus: To win over Afghans, US must listen
      Timeline: Afghanistan in crisis

    Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state was expected to urge the delegates to commit more trainers at the meeting, which was closed to the media.

    The meeting also addressed the "Afghan first" policy, whereby the use of Afghan contractors and suppliers are prioritised for all foreign agencies' work in the country in order to help build a more profitable economy.

    Nato called this policy "the most important step in promoting the development of the Afghan private sector and supporting the economic development of the country," in a statement issued on Friday.

    The transitional plan expected to be endorsed by the meeting will include a political plan for security to be cleared by Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, a source close to the talks said.

    The transition to Afghan security personnel will take place region by region and its strategy will be established by staff on the ground, the source said.

    Obama committed an additional 30,000 troops to the war in December last year in order to combat Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters.

    There are more than 90,000 Nato soldiers from 40 nations in Afghanistan. They entered the country following the US invasion in 2001 after the September 11 attacks on the US of the same year.

    A gun battle south of Kabul, the Afghan capital, on Friday led to the deaths of two Nato soldiers from the US and five opposition fighters.

    The battle occurred during a nightime raid in Logar province, with the two US troops suffering injuries from which they subsequently died, Nato's International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.