[QODLink]
Europe
Airlines count volcano chaos cost
Revenue lost due to grounded flights estimated at $1.7bn as air traffic returns to normal.
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 06:45 GMT
The Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland is still erupting
but spewing less ash and smoke [AFP]

Carriers in Europe are counting their losses as air traffic over the continent returns to normal after ashes from an Icelandic volcano eruption caused a week of chaos.

Eurocontrol, Europe's air safety authority, said they expected air traffic to be "almost 100 per cent" on Thursday, after a week of flight chaos.

But several airports in Sweden, Norway and Finland have been closed again after restrictions were first lifted on Wednesday.

The International Air Transport Association (Iata) put the overall cost to the airline industry at $1.7bn.

"For an industry that lost $9.4bn last year and was forecast to lose a further $2.8bn in 2010, this crisis is devastating," Giovanni Bisignani, the Iata chief, said.

Bisignani said an extraordinary situation had been exacerbated by "poor decision-making" from governments, which he said now need to look at how to compensate the airlines.

"I am the first one to say that this industry does not want or need bail-outs. But this crisis is not the result of running our business badly," he said.

Clearing backlog

Even though air traffic has resumed, airlines are still struggling to clear a backlog of passengers and cargo after about 100,000 flights were cancelled in the last week.

The ash cloud from a volcano eruption on Iceland caused air-traffic authorities across Europe to close airspace and millions of people were affected.

Special report
Volcano chaos

Several airline executives, including Willie Walsh, the British Airways chief, have questioned if the long-lasting shutdowns were really necessary.

"I don't believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday," he said.

"My personal belief is that we could have safely continued operating for a period of time."

Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's chief executive, condemned what he called the slow response by authorities.


Airlines say the ash chaos cost them $1.7bn

"It might have made sense to ground flights for a day or two. That's understandable. But there should have been a much faster response by the governments, the transport ministers and the regulators," he said.

One vulcanologist advising the United Nations said the authorities had had no choice but to close their airspace because of the lack of hard facts about aircraft behaviour in volcanic ash.

"There is at the moment no reliable data on the exact concentration of ash in the atmosphere and when an aircraft can fly, or not, through such plumes," Henry Gaudru, president of the European Vulcanological Society, said.

In Iceland, the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier remained active on Wednesday, throwing huge magma chunks into the air, spewing lava and producing tremors.

But it was not shooting ash and smoke six to 10 kilometres into
the air like it did previously.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.