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Reshuffle follows Sarkozy poll loss
French president reshuffles cabinet after heavy defeat in regional elections.
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2010 21:48 GMT
There has been increasingly open criticism of Sarkozy from within his own party [EPA]

Nicolas Sarkozy, the French president, has reshuffled his government after a humiliating defeat by the left in the second-round of regional elections.

Xavier Darcos, the country's labour minister, was replaced on Monday by Eric Woerth, the budget minister, whose position in turn was taken by Francois Baroin.

Only one other official left the government and three new figures were brought in, with Sarkozy preferring to reserve a more sweeping reshuffle until closer to the 2012 presidential ballot, sources said.

Terming the changes "a minor shuffle", Jacques Reland, a French political analyst, told Al Jazeera: "They do not show any change in policy. It is just a cosmetic change of personnel. The most significant loss is Xavier Darcos - he has been used as a scapegoat."

The ruling UMP party took only about 36 per cent of Sunday's vote, while the Socialist party and its allies won around 54 per cent.

The result left the UMP in charge of only one of France's 26 regions in the last ballot-box test of Sarkozy's popularity before the 2012 presidential election.

Claude Gueant, Sarkozy's chief of staff, said the results were a "big wake-up call for quick and effective action" to tackle unemployment and other effects of the economic crisis".

Blame for defeat

Francois Fillon, the country's prime minister, said he accepted his share of the blame for the defeat.

Fillon said the government would press ahead with reforms that include an overhaul of the pensions system, and would make jobs and economic growth an "absolute priority".

Sunday's elections were regarded as a major test for Sarkozy and an informal kick-off to the 2012 presidential race.

in depth

 

  Sarkozy's French paradox
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Martine Aubry, the Socialist party leader, called on the left to retake power at a national level.

"The French have expressed their rejection of the politics of the president and the government," she said.

Sarkozy was elected in 2007 on promises to boost France's economy and get people back to work, but last year's recession has driven unemployment up to 10 per cent, its highest level in a  decade.

Fears about job losses, immigration and security, as well as resentment about issues such as bank bail-outs and executive pay have all dented Sarkozy's popularity, which has fallen since he won approval for his handling of the financial crisis in 2008.

The powerful CGT union has called for a day of protest over wages and pensions on Tuesday.

Other groups, such as farmers, may also see a big defeat for the centre-right as an opportunity to put pressure on the government.

"The only chance that Sarkozy may be in a good position in 2011-2012 is successful reform of pensions, which is one of the big challenges for any French government," Reland, the political analyst, told Al Jazeera.

Increasing criticism

There has been increasingly open criticism of Sarkozy's leadership from within the UMP, where some well-known party figures including Alain Juppe, a former prime minister, are calling for a change of course.

Jean-Francois Cope, the head of the UMP parliamentary group and one of Sarkozy's main rivals in the party, said: "We can't hide from this.

"This is obviously a real defeat for us. You can't beat about the bush. That's the reality of it."

The centre-right suffered one of its worst losses in years in the first round of the ballot on March 14, with Sarkozy's party scoring just 26 per cent as the Socialists took 29 per cent and the broader left parties combined claimed some 50 per cent.

Regional councils in 25 regions, 22 on the French mainland and three overseas territories, were up for grabs, the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe having already been won outright by the Socialists in the first round of voting.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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