[QODLink]
Europe
MI5 chief denies Binyam 'cover-up'
Head of British intelligence agency denies information witheld on UK resident's torture.
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2010 14:32 GMT
Evans said MI5 'did not practise mistreatment or torture' [AP]

The head of Britain's domestic intelligence service has defended his organisation's work amid a row over claims it tried to cover up information it knew about the the torture of Binyam Mohamed, a UK resident.

Writing in the Daily Telegraph newspaper, Jonathan Evans, MI5's director-general, denied allegations from one of Britain's most senior judges that the agency had a "culture of suppression."

In rare public comments, Evans said the accusation, which came in a draft court ruling relating to the case of Mohamed, a former Guantanamo Bay inmate, was the "precise opposite of the truth".

In his harsh critcism of MI5 on Wednesday, which was removed from the final published court judgement but leaked out, Judge Lord Neuberger also accused the service of failing to respect human rights and misleading parliament.

No collusion

Evans admitted that British intelligence was "slow to detect" US mistreatment of detainees after the September 11, 2001, attacks on America.

But he said: "We in the [British] agencies did not practise mistreatment or torture then and do not do so now, nor do we collude or encourage others to torture on our behalf."

Judges handed down the ruling as they ordered the release of once-secret information about the case of Mohamed, which showed he had been subject to abuse at the hands of US authorities. 

The CIA had passed the information to British intelligence, and judges released it after David Miliband, the British foreign minister, lost a court appeal for it not to be released.

The judges rejected the UK government's claim that disclosing the information would damage intelligence co-operation with US agencies.

The publication of the seven-paragraph summary showing the UK was aware of the US authorities' abuse, combined with the judge's criticism, has intensified arguments in the UK about MI5's alleged attempts to conceal its collusion in torture.

'Propaganda' opportunity

Evans also warned that Britain's enemies could use the escalating row as "propaganda to undermine our will and ability to confront them".

Ethiopian-born Mohamed, who came to Britain in 1994 seeking asylum, claims that in Morocco in 2002 he was questioned by people using information that could only have come from the British intelligence service.

Miliband disclosed on Wednesday that police were investigating allegations of criminal actions by a British official linked to the case. 

Mohamed was arrested in Pakistan in 2002 while trying to return to Britain and spent nearly seven years in US custody or in countries taking part in the US-run rendition programme of terrorism suspects.

After a lengthy campaign by his supporters, he became the first prisoner to be released from Guantanamo under the administration of Barack Obama, the US president, and returned to Britain in February last year. 

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
join our mailing list