[QODLink]
Europe
Dutch to levy 'green' road tax
New bill aims to reduce road congestion, carbon emissions and fatal accidents.
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2009 11:31 GMT
Taxis, vehicles for the disabled, buses, motorcycles and classic cars are exempt from the bill [EPA]

The Dutch government has approved a bill to impose tax on drivers for every kilometer they are on the road, a move it says will reduce traffic jams, fatal accidents and carbon emissions.

The new tax charges drivers of an average-size passenger car a base rate of $0.07 cents per kilometer, beginning in 2012.

While taxis, vehicles for the disabled, buses, motorcycles and classic cars will be exempt, drivers of heavier and, therefore, more polluting vehicles will pay more. The cost will go up for driving in peak hours.

GPS will track the time, hour and distance each car moves and send the data to a billing agency.

In return, the government says annual road taxes and purchase tax for new cars will be abolished - reducing the cost of a new car by 25 per cent, the Dutch transport ministry said.

The ministry also says around six out of 10 drivers will benefit under the system, which shifts the tax burden to people who drive the most and at peak hours.

Congestion is expected to be halved and carbon emissions cut by 10 per cent, though the tax rate may increase every year until 2018.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
Featured
As nuclear age approaches eighth decade, visitors flock to historic bomb craters at New Mexico test sites.
Venezuela's president lacks the charisma and cult of personality maintained by the late Hugo Chavez.
Despite the Geneva deal, anti-government protesters in Ukraine's eastern regions don't intend to leave any time soon.
Since independence, Zimbabwe has faced food shortages, hyperinflation - and several political crises.
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
join our mailing list