Europe
Italy denies 'Taliban payoff deal'
Defence chief seeks to sue paper for report Rome paid Taliban to keep Afghan areas safe.
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2009 13:46 GMT
The newspaper accused Italy of paying off Taliban fighters to keep certain areas safe [AFP]

A British newspaper report alleging 10 French soldiers died in Afghanistan because Italy failed to inform them of a Taliban payoff deal has been strongly denied by both Italy and France.

The Times newspaper reported on Thursday that Italy's secret services paid the Taliban "tens of thousands of dollars" to keep the Sarobi area in Afghanistan safe for its troops, but did not tell Nato allies about the deal.

It accused Italy of misleading the French, who took over control of the district in mid-2008, into believing the area was safe, leaving them unprepared for the attack in which the soldiers died.

But the office of Silvio Berlusconi, Italy's prime minister, called the report "completely groundless", while the country's defence minister added he wanted to sue the newspaper.

"The Berlusconi government has never authorised nor has it allowed any form of payment toward members of the Taliban insurgence," a statement from the prime minister's office said.

'Rumours'

Admiral Christophe Prazuck, a spokesman for the French military, also dismissed the report as "baseless".

"These are rumours, and it is not the first time we have heard them," he said.

But Jean-Marc Ayrault, leader of the opposition Socialists, called for a review of the Afghan mission, in which 2,900 French troops are serving.

The Times report said that because the French were not informed of the alleged deal they made a "catastrophically incorrect threat assessment" of the area.

It said US intelligence officials had discovered through intercepted phone conversations that the Italians had been buying off fighters in Herat province, western Afghanistan.

The paper continued that a number of high-ranking Nato officers had told it that payments were discovered to have been made in the Sarobi area as well.

Following the ambush in August 2008, in which the French troops were killed, reports emerged that the soldiers had been poorly equipped, and only had one radio, which went dead, leaving them unable to call for help.

However, the French military have denied these reports.

Prazuck said French, Italian and Turkish troops, all of whom oversee the Kabul region, had a relationship of "trust, full transparency".

"We share information constantly with the Italians, the Turks and the French in Kabul, daily, regularly," he said.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
join our mailing list