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Video: Jordan's organ trade
Jordan is one of many countries where illegal trade in organs is growing.
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2009 17:49 GMT

The global trade in human organs is growing. The poor and desperate are being driven to extreme measures - willing to sell body parts because of the global economic crisis.

Iran is the only country in the world where it is legal to sell an organ for money. Everywhere else, it is banned, and there's a huge black market.

Donors receive as little as $1,000 for a kidney, although the going rate is around $5,000.

The real money is made by the brokers who charge up to $200,000 to organise a transplant for a wealthy patient. India, Egypt, Moldova and Brazil are among the world's leading providers of organs.

They are either sold domestically or exported to patients in the US, Europe, the United Arab Emirates and Israel.

The most commonly traded organs are kidneys, corneas and livers. It is believed as many as 15,000 kidneys could be trafficked every year.

Al Jazeera's Nisreen el Shamayleh reports on the rising organ trade in Jordan.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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