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Rights group halts Chechnya work
Memorial says decision prompted by murder of prominent activist Natalia Estemirova.
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2009 13:59 GMT
Estemirova's death has sparked outrage from international rights groups [AFP]

Russian human rights group Memorial has suspended its work in Chechnya following the murder of Natalia Estemirova, one of the most outspoken activists of the organisation.

Russia's Ekho Moskvy radio quoted Alexander Cherkasov, a Memorial executive committee member, as saying on Saturday that the decision was taken out of concern for other workers in the Chechnya office.

"We have seen that the work that Natalia [Estemirova] was involved in, the work done by our colleagues in Chechnya - documenting crimes committed by representatives of the authorities - is fatally dangerous.

"We can't put them at risk," he was quoted as saying.

Estemirova was found dead on Wednesday afternoon with gunshot wounds to the head and chest, hours after she was seen being bundled into a car outside her home in Grozny, the Chechen capital.

Controversial leader

Estemirova was one of Memorial's main employees in Chechnya and had won worldwide acclaim for uncovering rights abuses.

In depth

 Chechen president blamed for activist's death
 Q&A: Murder of Chechen activist
 Chechnya's battle for independence
 Witness: Chechen fighters
 Witness: Chechen syndrome
 Witness: Lost children of Chechnya

Her death prompted tributes from around the globe and calls on Russia to find the killers.

Oleg Orlov, who heads Memorial, accused Ramzan Kadyrov, Chechnya's pro-Kremlin leader, of being responsible for the murder, saying he was guilty irrespective of who ordered the killing.

Kadyrov's lawyer responded by saying he was suing Orlov for defamation in order to protect the "honour, worthiness and professional reputation of the president of the Chechen Republic".

Kadyrov had earlier personally telephoned Orlov to rebuke him for his allegations.

"You are not a prosecutor or a judge therefore your claims about my guilt are not ethical, to put it mildly, and are insulting to me," the Chechen strongman told Orlov, according to an account of the conversation posted on Kadyrov's website.

Reporters killed in Russia

 January 2009: Anastasia Baburova, a trainee reporter on Novaya Gazeta, shot dead alongside Stanislav Markelov, a Russian human rights lawyer.

 October 2006: Anna Politkovskaya, well-known Kremlin critic and human rights campaigner shot dead outside her apartment.

 July 2003: Yuri Shchekochikhin, deputy editor of Novaya Gazeta, died from an unexplained illness his colleagues said was a result of poisoning.

"I am sure that you have to think about my rights before declaring for everyone to hear that I am guilty of Estemirova's death," he said.

Orlov had said in a statement, "I know, I am sure who is guilty of Natalia Estemirova's murder, we all know him - his name is Ramzan Kadyrov."

"We do not know if he gave the order himself or his close associates did so to please their boss," Orlov said.

Kadyrov is a controversial figure, praised by the Kremlin for restoring some stability to Chechnya but hated by rights activists, who accuse him of letting his personal security force carry out kidnappings and torture.

In April, Russia ended its controversial "anti-terror operation" in Chechnya, a move that analysts said gave the maverick leader a freer hand in running the region.

Source:
Agencies
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