[QODLink]
Europe
Launch to double space station crew
Russian spacecraft lifts off with three more astronauts to man International Space Station.
Last Modified: 27 May 2009 13:32 GMT
Thirsk, left, De Winne, centre, and Romanenko  are due to dock with the ISS on Friday [AFP]

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft with three astronauts on board has lifted off from Kazakhstan in a mission that will increase the International Space Station crew to six for the first time.

Robert Thirsk, a Canadian; Frank De Winne, a Belgian; and Roman Romanenko, a Russian, safely reached their targeted orbit of about 200km to 242km above the earth on Thursday.

Speaking by radio as the rocket raced into space on the start of its two-day journey to the orbiting station, Romanenko said: "We feel okay. The flight is normal... I can see the sun."

The Soyuz TMA-15 spaceship is scheduled to dock with the ISS on Friday.

'Incredible things'

The incoming crew will join Gennady Padalka, a Russian; Michael Barratt, an American; and Koichi Wakata, a Japanese citizen.

Friday's docking will mark the first time all the partners in the station - the US, Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada - will be represented at the same time on board.

Shortly before his departure from the Baikonur cosmodrome, De Winne said: "It's a very good example that shows the whole world that when countries want to work together for the good of their children we can do incredible things.

"It would be impossible for one country to maintain six people aboard the space station.

"But thanks to the international co-operation, not just aboard the ISS but between all the space organisations, it will be possible."

Sophisticated platform

The European Space Agency now receives 8.3 per cent of the experiment time aboard the ISS, meaning that it can send an astronaut to the station for a six-month mission every two years.

De Winne will take over from Padalka as commander of the ISS when the crew is rotated in October, the first time a West European has been given this responsibility.

The Belgian will then return to earth in November.

The station has become a sophisticated platform for scientific experiments after the installation of a European laboratory last year and the arrival of a hi-tech Japanese lab, Kibo, which is currently being completed.

A huge new solar array was installed earlier this year to give more power.

Amid an array of new technology, one feature new arrivals will have to get used to is a facility installed this month that enables astronauts to drink their recycled urine.

In one study to be carried out on the station, Thirsk, 55, will take medication usually prescribed to geriatric patients to counter the effects of bone loss in space.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps have been released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.