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My brother Radovan Karadzic
Al Jazeera speaks to the brother of the recently arrested Serbian war crimes suspect.
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2008 15:34 GMT
Luka says his brother Karadzic "helped many Muslims and Croats and Serbs ... even in his second identity as Dr Dabic, left [EPA]

Every day at 6pm Luka makes his way to the centre of Belgrade to join hundreds of others to march through the streets of the Serbian capital to demand the release of Radovan Karadzic.

For Luka, it is personal as the man who was the world's most wanted war crimes suspect is his brother.

With his bald head and pure white bushy moustache, he is an easy figure to pick out as he carries the banner and chants the words, but he knows the battle is over, the fight has been lost.

Radovan Karadzic will soon be facing war crimes charges at The Hague.

We spoke at the edge of the latest protest in the square in front of the National museum. 

It has been a week since his brother was arrested.

Everyone wants to know how he managed to steer clear of the authorities for so long.

'Skilful man'

Luka suggests it took more than a good disguise for his brother to remain free.

Luka says the trial will clear his brother of wrongdoing [Reuters]

"He is a smart and skilful man. He knows the spirit of the people. I don't know how he fell after so many years. It was probably a big act of treason. What happened is still unclear to me and to him. But one day it will be clear what actually happened."

Luka has gone every day to the special court in Belgrade to visit his older brother.

Together they have discussed the charges Karadzic faces.

He believes the court will see it has no basis to proceed.

"I don't think anything positive about the tribunal. The indictment was written and all the worst things that could be put into it, have been. But there is no link with my brother and there is no link with what actually happened in Bosnia and there is no link with the behaviour of the Serbian people and Serbian fighters in that war," he says.

War atrocities

Karadzic faces eleven charges including genocide and crimes against humanity for his role in the wars in the Balkans in the 1990s.

But his brother insists he did what he did for his country.

"He is proud of everything that happened there. And this is not a question about Radovan Karadzic and his destiny. The question is what he did for the Serbian people and what he did for the other side, for Muslims and Croats.

"But nobody would like to give a fair picture of that but Radovan Karadzic will show that in court with a lot of witnesses and documents," he says.

Luka believes the world's impression of his brother is not congruent with reality.

"People who know him, they know that Radovan is not a man like that. He is a doctor, he is a humanist, he's a poet, he's an intellectual, a man who helped many Muslims and Croats and Serbs. And even in his second identity as Dr Dabic he treated members of every nationality."

Luka plans to continue his daily protests. But he accepts while he is on the streets of Belgrade, his brother will be thousands of miles away, in a court at The Hague.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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