[QODLink]
Europe
Chess genius Bobby Fischer dies
Ex-world champion became US national hero for beating Soviet Union's Boris Spassky.
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2008 21:24 GMT
Fischer faced arrest in the US after breaking sanctions to play Spassky in Yugoslavia in 1992 [AP]

Bobby Fischer, the United States's first and only world chess champion, has died in Iceland at the age of 64.
 
He became a national hero for beating the Soviet Union's Boris Spassky in Reykjavik in 1972.
 
However, he later fell foul of US authorities for violating sanctions on former Yugoslavia by playing a match there again with Spassky.
Rumours that Fischer, once dubbed the "Mozart of Chess", had been ill had circulated in recent weeks on chess-related websites.
 
National radio in Iceland, where Fischer had become a resident, reported that he had died after a serious, but unspecified, illness.

Child prodigy

Fischer, a child prodigy who once said he liked to watch his opponents squirm, had become an Icelandic citizen after he faced jail in the US for playing the Yugoslavia match with Spassky.

Garry Kasparov, another former world chess champion, hailed Fischer as "the pioneer and the father of professional chess.

"Fischer's chess was so fresh and so new and we all grew up under the strongest impression of Fischer's victories. From an ideological stance it was the fight of an individual against a totalitarian system.

"He had a lot of supporters even in the Soviet Union. No one viewed him as an American fighting Soviets, it was more a great man fighting the mighty machine."

Spassky, who now lives in Paris, was less eloquent on the subject of his old adversary.

Asked by Reuters for his reaction, he said: "It's bad luck for you. Bobby Fischer is dead," then hung up without further comment. 

Controversial statements

The brilliant and unpredictable American abandoned his world title without moving a pawn by failing to defend his crown in Manila in 1975.

World chess authorities reluctantly awarded it to challenger Anatoly Karpov of the Soviet Union, who was to hold it for the next decade.

Fischer withdrew into himself, not playing in public and living on little more than the magic of his name, although millions of enthusiasts regarded him as the king of chess.

He made headlines when he came out of seclusion to play Spassky in Yugoslavia in 1992, at a time when the country was the target of sanctions during Belgrade's war with breakaway republics.

He vanished after the match, for which he won $3m, and resurfaced after the September 11, 2001, attacks on the US.

In an interview with a Philippine radio station, Fischer praised the strikes and said he wanted to see America "wiped out".

Fischer, who also stirred controversy with anti-Semitic remarks, was granted Icelandic citizenship in March 2005 after eight months in detention in Japan fighting a US deportation order.

Asked who was the greatest player in the world, he once replied: "It's nice to be modest, but it would be stupid if I did not tell the truth. It is Fischer."

Kasparov said that Fischer's withdrawal from chess had been a "great loss" and that he regretted his controversial political statements.

But Fischer's career of "phenomenal victories crushing the best players in the world" was "probably one of the greatest or even the greatest in the history of chess," Kasparov said.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.