Saakashvili wins Georgia election

Observers validate result but opponents take to the streets claiming vote was rigged.

    Thousands of supporters of opposition candidate Levan Gachechiladze gathered in Tbilisi [EPA]

    Gachechiladze told opposition supporters who gathered in the snow in Tbilisi's central Rike Square that he came first in the vote and said a second round was necessary.

    Tally challenged
     
    Gachechiladze cited a tally by his supporters who served on election commissions across the country.

    "Mikhail Saakashvili: it is impossible to defeat the Georgian people. We will defend our vote by legal means," he said.

    "Saakashvili lost and it cannot happen that Georgia will not defend it's freedom, that we won't win."

    Protesters chanted "Georgia, Georgia" and held their index fingers up to represent the number one, Gachechiladze's number on the ballot paper.

    He said more rallies would take place after the Orthodox Christmas on Monday.

    'Competitive and valid'

    International monitors disagreed with the opposition saying that the poll had revealed "significant challenges" but was "competitive" and "valid".

    "Saakashvili lost and it cannot happen that Georgia will not defend it's freedom, that we won't win"


    Levan Gachechiladze, opposition candidate

    "I perceive this election as a viable expression of the free choice of the Georgian people" Alcee Hastings, a senior election observer for the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), said.

    The US said that the opposition should respect the report from Western election observers.

    "If the experts determine that the election was not rigged, then there is absolutely no justification, and it would be absolutely undemocratic, to claim otherwise," Matthew Bryza, Washington's top emissary to the region, the deputy assistant secretary of state, said.

    Nino Burdzhanadze, the parliament speaker who is serving as acting president during the campaign, conceded there had been some violations.
     
    But said her government welcomed the criticism and would seek to correct the mistakes in future elections.

    "What is most important is that, in general, as a whole, the elections were free and fair and democratic," she said.
     

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    What happens when the US government shuts down?

    The US government has shut down. What happens next?

    US federal government begins partial shutdown after Senate blocks short-term spending bill. What happens next?

    Why is the West praising Malala, but ignoring Ahed?

    Why is the West praising Malala, but ignoring Ahed?

    Is an empowered Palestinian girl not worthy of Western feminist admiration?