UN discusses Kosovo deadlock

Ethnic Albanian leaders push for independence but Serbia calls for further talks.

    Thousands of Serbs in northern Kosovo protested against independence on Tuesday [AFP]
    However, Vojislav Kostunica, Serbia's prime minsiter, said that he would urge the 15 council members to call for more talks between the parties to reach a compromise that would exclude Kosovo's independence.

    During the negotiations which ended in November, Belgrade offered Kosovo, which has been administered by the UN for eight years, broad autonomy.

    Acceptable solution

    Russia, a veto-wielding permanent member of the Security Council, is supporting Serbia's call for further talks with Kosovo's ethnic Albanian leaders.

    Al Jazeera in Kosovo


    Kosovo's divided city



    Roma refugees return to roots


    War of words in Serbia's 'Jerusalem'



    Kosovo's political football

    Vitaly Churkin, Russia's ambassador to the UN, has appealed to the international community to "encourage them to reach a mutually acceptable solution to this problem".

    And Sergei Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister, has accused the West of forcing Kosovo into an "uncompromising position".

    "This in effect is blocking negotiations," he said.

    But the US, Britain and France say that talks have been exhausted and it is time to resolve the province's future status.

    John Sawers, Britain's ambassador to the UN, said before the meeting that he did not expect the council to find common ground given the deep divisions.

    Phased recognition

    On Friday, EU leaders rejected immediate unilateral recognition of an independent Kosovo but agreed to try to co-ordinate a phased-in recognition of the state's independence.

    Thaci has said that any declaration of independence will be co-ordinated with US and EU partners.

    The Security Council meeting comes the day after several thousand people protested against Kosovan independence in the predominantly-Serb north of the divided town of Mitrovica.
      
    "Kosovo, Soul of Serbia," said one of the banners waved by the protesters. Another bearing a picture of Vladimir Putin, Russian president, declared" "SOS, Save Our Souls."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    No country in the world recognises Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    North Korea's nuclear weapons: Here is what we know

    North Korea's nuclear weapons