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UK Muslims condemn attacks
Newspaper advertisements highlight opposition to recent failed bombings.
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2007 18:41 GMT
Hibatullah said the objective of the advertisement was to get the voice of ordinary Muslims heard
British Muslim communities have taken out newspaper advertisements condemning the recent attempted bomb attacks in London and at Glasgow airport in Scotland.

The "Muslims United" advertisement is being placed in the UK's Guardian and Metro newspapers.
It rejects any attempts to link criminal attacks to the teachings of Islam, and calls for society to remain united.

The advertisement is supported by all mainstream Muslim organisations in the UK and individuals from a wide range of professions, organisers said.
Ihtisham Hibatullah, spokesman for the British Muslim Initiative, which is helping organise the campaign, said doctors made up the bulk of those who had joined the campaign.
 
"The overwhelming response has come from the medical profession," he said, highlighting the fact that seven of the people detained over the recent failed attacks were from the medical profession.
 
"People in the profession want to be heard saying 'not in their name'."
 
Condemnation call
 
Some newspaper editorials have called for the British Muslim community to speak out and condemn the attempted attacks in Haymarket last Friday and Glasgow on Saturday.
 
Hibatullah said the advertisement was not in response to those editorials but to get the voices of ordinary Muslims heard.
 
The British Muslim Initiative website

The advertisement says: "We are united with the rest of the country at this critical time and are determined to work together to avert any such attacks targeting our fellow citizens, property and country."
 
It also called on the government to work towards a "just and lasting peace in areas of conflict around the world".
 
Yusra Khreegi, a Muslims United campaigner, said: "The message of this campaign is to condemn these attacks and to make sure that they have no justification in Islam."
 
"It is unfortunate that there is an association in the minds of some between Islam and terrorism, despite the fact that Muslim communities in Britain and around the world have condemned the events of 9/11 and July 7.
 
"And made sure that it is loud and clear that these events are criminal and they are not done in the name of Islam."
 
A similar advertisement appeared after the July 2005 bombings on the London transport network in which four young British Muslims killed 52 people in suicide bombings.
 
Khreegi said: "Our message of condemnation ... has not always been highlighted in the media.
 
"It is very important to make sure that the voice of the overwhelming majority of Muslims, who are law abiding citizens, rather than the tiny unrepresentative voice of the radicals."
 
Hibatullah praised the government's handling of events under Gordon Brow, the new British prime minister.
 
"There have been no draconian laws rushed through or raids. The general perception in the Muslim community is that things have changed."

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