[QODLink]
Europe
Trial suspended as doctors delay
Serbian nationalist Vojislav Seselj's medical examination is delayed until Tuesday.
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2006 18:21 GMT
Seselj, leader of the Serbian Radical party, is facing war crimes charges at The Hague

Doctors due to visit a Serbian nationalist leader as he awaits trial at The Hague for war crimes have delayed their examination until Tuesday.
 
Vojislav Seselj, the leader of the Serbian Radical party has been on hunger strike for 24 days, and his supporters say he is close to death.
The medical examination had been scheduled for Monday, but was delayed by a day.
 
A  spokeswoman from the UN war crimes tribunal said: "Arrangements are being made for doctors to come to The Hague today [Monday]. The exam is due to take place tomorrow."
Seselj went on hunger strike after the court decided to assign him a defence lawyer against his wishes.
 
He was transferred to a prison hospital for monitoring last week and Serbian media reports he has now lost 19kg.
 
On Sunday he called for his supporters to continue their goal of a greater Serbia if he dies.
 
His trial in The Hague was adjourned indefinitely on Friday. The prosecution had been due to start next week.
 
Tens of thousands of Serbs protested in front of the US embassy in Belgrade on Saturday in defence of Seselj. Some have claimed he will be seen as a martyr if he dies.
 
The Radical's leader surrendered to the Hague in 2003 to answer charges of war crimes against non-Serbs in the 1990s and plotting crimes with Slobodan Milosevic, the late Serbian president, who died in detention in March just months before his trial was due to end.
 
Officials are concerned that Seselj may also die without completing his trial.
Seselj pleaded not guilty and routinely disrupted pre-trial proceedings, insulting judges and calling his assigned lawyers "spies" and "actors posing as lawyers".
Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.