German police find more radiation

Radiation traces found in two properties are linked to Litvinenko contact.

    Kovtun met Litvinenko on the day
    he fell ill from radiation poisoning

    Police said they were questioning Kovtun's ex-wife, an unnamed 31-year-old. 

     

    Investigation widens

     

    Your Views

    "His [Litvinenko's] murder has to be condemned because he was murdered for his views and his knowledge."

    Mikey, London, UK

    Send us your views

    Police experts are trying to determine if the radioactivity came from polonium 210, the highly radioactive substance which killed Litvinenko.

     

    British authorities are treating Litvinenko's death as murder.

     

    Following the discovery of the radiation traces at the two properties in Germany, the investigation was widened to include a Germanwings airliner used by Kovtun on November 1 - the day he flew to London to meet Litvinenko.

     

    No radioactivity was detected and the aircraft was returned to service.

     

    Kovtun, one of three Russians who met Litvinenko in London on November 1, was also reported on Friday to be suffering from radiation sickness.

     

    There have been conflicting reports on Kovtun's condition, with a lawyer denying claims that he had fallen into a coma.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.