[QODLink]
Central & South Asia

Afghan officials reject vote-fraud claims

Denial comes in reply to front-runner Abdullah Abdullah's allegations against head of Independent Election Commission.

Last updated: 17 Jun 2014 10:23
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Abdullah has often said that only widespread ballot-rigging could stop him from winning 2014 elections [EPA]

Afghanistan's election authorities have strongly denied that top officials were guilty of fraud after front-running presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah made allegations that could upset a smooth transition of power.

Abdullah's fraud claims put him in direct conflict with the Independent Election Commission (IEC), raising fears of political instability as the bulk of US-led troops withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of the year.

Abdullah demanded the dismissal of Zia-ul-Haq Amarkhail, head of the IEC secretariat, over Amarkhail's alleged attempt to remove unused ballots from its headquarters in Kabul on the polling day.

Our complete Afghanistan coverage

However, AFP news agency quoted Ahmad Yousuf Nuristani, IEC chairman, on Monday as rejecting the accusations against Amarkhail, and stating that the turnout figure was an early estimate that might be adjusted.

Abdullah has also said the IEC's turnout figure of seven million voters in Saturday's run-off election was probably false.

"I strongly reject these allegations," Nuristani said, adding that Amarkhail was stopped by police when he was overseeing the delivery of extra ballot papers to polling stations that had run out.

"It was a misunderstanding between police and our staff," Nuristani said.

"We do not want a crisis for the people of Afghanistan. They are tired of crises."

'Give electoral bodies time'

The dispute erupted despite pleas from the UN, the US and the EU for Abdullah and his poll rival Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai to give officials time to conduct the count and adjudicate on fraud complaints.

"We continue to feel that it's important to give the Afghan electoral bodies the time they need to do their work in processing the outcome of these elections," Jen Psaki, US State Department spokeswoman, said.

RELATED: Afghans bank future on the next president

A successful election is a key test of the 13-year international military and aid effort to develop Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001.

First round of Afghan presidential elections were held on April 5.

Abdullah believes fraud denied him victory in the 2009 presidential race, and has often said that only widespread ballot-rigging could stop him from winning this time.

366

Source:
AFP
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.