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Central & South Asia

LeT denies role in India consulate attack

Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Taiba says its operations are limited to India-administered Kashmir alone.

Last updated: 27 May 2014 13:27
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Afghan President Hamid Karzai blamed the banned rebel group for targeting the Indian consulate [EPA]

Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), a banned rebel group, has denied that it was behind an attack last week on an Indian diplomatic mission in Afghanistan, according to reports.

"We have nothing to do with any attack in Afghanistan," LeT's spokesperson Abdullah Ghaznavi told The Associated Press news agency on Tuesday.

The denial has come a day after Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai told an Indian television channel that the Pakistan-based rebel group was behind last Friday's attack on the consulate in western Afghanistan.

Gunmen armed with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades attacked the building in Herat, but the diplomatic staff escaped unharmed.

Karzai said he received the information from "a Western intelligence agency".

Kashmir-centric only

"Hamid Karzai's claim is not based on truth. We condemn the attack," Ghaznavi said in a separate call to AFP news agency.

"Our operations are limited to Jammu and Kashmir alone, and these will continue until the dawn of freedom for the territory," he said.

LeT has been active in India-administered Kashmir since the early 1990s and the group has allegedly carried out many attacks against the Indian forces in the disputed Himalayan region.

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