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Central & South Asia

Indian journalists asked to leave Pakistan

Two reporters working for Press Trust of India and The Hindu told their visas would not be renewed.

Last updated: 14 May 2014 11:26
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Pakistan remains one of the world's most dangerous place for journalists to operate [File: EPA]

Pakistan has asked two Indian journalists stationed in the capital, Islamabad, to leave within a week, without giving any explanations.

According to the Reuters news agency, Snehesh Alex Philip of The Press Trust of India and Meena Menon of The Hindu newspaper received letters on Tuesday telling them that their visas would not be renewed.

Both had been in Pakistan for less than a year.

Philip confirmed the letter on Twitter, saying "Yes, It is true. Meena and I have been given a week's time to leave."

The move came amid simmering tensions between Pakistan's powerful military and a civilian government that appears dovish towards neighbour India, where Hindu nationalist opposition leader Narendra Modi appears set to win a general election.

Dangeorus place

Pakistan has become an increasingly dangerous place for journalists to operate, but restrictions put on Indian reporters' movements are stricter than for other foreign journalists.

Last year, the government expelled a reporter from The New York Times.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has repeatedly said that he wanted to improve relations with India and has pledged to improve press freedom.

The two governments have a reciprocal arrangement allowing two correspondents from each country to be stationed in the other's capital.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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