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Central & South Asia

Dozens 'abducted' by Pakistan Taliban

At least 40 tribesmen suspected to be involved in drug trade reportedly kidnapped in Tirah valley.

Last updated: 12 Apr 2014 18:04
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Armed men belonging to the Tehreek-e-Taliban have reportedly abducted at least 40 people in Pakistan's northern Tirah valley, official sources say.

Tirah valley is part of the Khyber Agency, one of the tribal areas where the Taliban is a powerful force.

A Peshawar-based reporter told Al Jazeera that scores of armed fighters took away the men. 

"Officials are now confirming these people [those abducted] were involded in some drug related business and there was a big fair where different kind of drugs were put on sale," Zahir Zheraz, the journalist, said.

Some local reports put the number of abducted at 100, but that figure remains unconfirmed.

The reported abductions come as leaders of the TTP mull whether to extend its ceasefire agreement and continue peace talks with Islamabad.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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