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Central & South Asia

Deadly blasts target Pakistan security forces

Eighteen people dead and over 70 wounded, police say, in blasts in Peshawar and Quetta.

Last updated: 14 Mar 2014 11:48
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Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is next to tribal areas home to networks such as the Pakistani Taliban [Al Jazeera]

Blasts targeting security forces in Pakistan have killed at least 18 people and wounded over 70, with some policemen among the injured, police and officials said.

A suicide bombing in the city of Peshawar killed eight people and wounded about 40 in the first incident on Friday. The blast went off near a police station on Sarband Road and police said the target was a security vehicle.

A separate explosion later on Friday killed 10 people and wounded 31 others in the southwestern city of Quetta, officials said.

City police chief Abdul Razzaq Cheema said a vehicle carrying security forces also appeared to have been the target of that attack, which happened outside a college in the centre of the city.

Peshawar, which is in the northwest of the country, has been hit by  a series of bombings and targeted killings since the start of 2014.

Last month,  an explosion in a cinema killed 13 people and wounded 20 others. 

The city is the capital of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, which lies next to tribal areas that are bases for several armed groups, including the Pakistani Taliban.

No group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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