[QODLink]
Central & South Asia

Pakistan peace talks hit by troop deaths

Taliban faction's claim to have killed soldiers prompts government negotiating team to withdraw from peace process.

Last updated: 17 Feb 2014 22:33
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Nawaz Sharif says Pakistan cannot afford such bloodshed, which has claimed 60 lives since talks began [AFP]

Peace talks between the Pakistani government and the Taliban have suffered a serious setback, after a faction of the armed group claimed it had executed 23 soldiers held hostage since June 2010.

A Pakistani government negotiator, Irfan Siddiqui, said on Monday there was no use in holding a scheduled meeting with the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan [TTP] after its Mohmand chapter said it had killed 23 members of the Frontier Corps.

Pakistan's prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, condemned the killings, which have not yet been confirmed by the armed group's main spokesman, calling them a "heinous" act. He said: "Pakistan cannot afford such bloodshed...The situation is very sad and the whole nation is shocked."

The government's absence from the negotiating table comes after local media reports saying that the Taliban shura [council] was expected to declare a temporary ceasefire. There have been no further details on this. 

Sharif announced the start of talks on January 29 to "give peace another chance" following seven years of violence that have claimed nearly 7,000 lives.

But meetings between between the government and representatives of the group seeking to overthrow it have offered little in the way of optimism, not least because scores of people have died in attacks and bombings since talks began on February 6.

210

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.