[QODLink]
Central & South Asia

First Saudi woman climbs to top of Everest

Raha Moharrak, 27, says she wants to inspire other women to scale world's highest mountain.

Last Modified: 18 May 2013 14:09
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
More than 3,000 people have scaled Everest but the mountain claims lives regularly [GALLO/GETTY]

A 27-year-old graphic design graduate has become the first ever Saudi woman to climb to the top of Mount Everest.

Raha Moharrak is the only female in a group of four Arabs who announced two months ago that they would be reaching the summit in 2013.

"The first ever Saudi woman to attempt Everest has reached the top!! Bravo Raha Moharrak. We salute you," said a tweet from the group.

The "Arabs with Altitude" group includes Mohammed Al Thani, a member of Qatar's royal family, Raed Zidan, a Palestinian real-estate businessman and Masoud Mohammad, an Iranian living in Dubai who owns an ice-cream franchise.

Ahead of her trip, Moharrak said: “I really don’t care about being the first ... so long as it inspires someone else to be the second."

Moharrak went to university in Sharjah, UAE, and is originally from Jeddah in Saudi Arabia.

"We are trying to raise one million dollars for Nepali education projects during our climb to the top," the group said on its website.

More than 3,000 people have successfully scaled Everest, but the mountain claims lives regularly, with even the best climbers falling victim to its fickle weather.

An 80-year-old Japanese mountaineer began his ascent of Mount Everest on Thursday, his website said, in a bid to become the oldest man to reach the roof of the world.

217

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list