[QODLink]
Central & South Asia

India gang-rape case sent to fast-track court

A lawyer for one of the five men accused of the gang-rape and murder says they will not get a fair trial in New Dehli.
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2013 15:33
The government set up fast-track courts to address criticisms against the Indian legal system [AFP]

An Indian judge has ordered the trial of five men accused in the fatal gang rape of a young woman on a bus last month to be shifted to a special fast-track court in New Delhi. 

The hearing of the December 16 gang rape and murder case of a 23-year-old medical student will be held in a fast track
court from January 21 and it will be on a day-to-day basis for five of the six defendants.

Charges against a sixth suspect, a juvenile, will be handled separately. 

VK Anand, a lawyer for one of the defendants said on Thursday that he would petition the Supreme Court to have the trial moved out of New Delhi as he doubted his client would receive a fair hearing in the capital.

Anand said the accused were "very much afraid of this that they will not get a fair trial, they will not get justice, because certain pressures are there and particularly being the capital, Delhi.

"In the interest of justice, this case must be transferred to other state other than Delhi to may be UP (Uttar Pradesh) itself."

The victim of the rape died at a Singapore hospital in December from injuries sustained during the assault. 

The case triggered nation-wide uproar against the Indian legal system and brought international attention to the issue of sexual violence. 

If convicted, the adult defendants could be sentenced to death.

234

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeeras new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Private citizens take initiative to help 'irregular' migrants, accusing governments of excessive focus on security.
Indonesia's cassava plantations are being killed by mealybugs, and thousands of wasps will be released to stop them.
Violence in Ain al-Arab has prompted many Kurdish Syrians to flee to Turkey, but others are returning to battle ISIL.
Unelected representatives quietly iron out logistics of massive TPP and TTIP deals among US, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.
Led by students concerned for their future with 'nothing to lose', it remains to be seen who will blink first.