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Central & South Asia
US army soldiers pose with dead Afghan
Photographs published by Der Spiegel newspaper reportedly show two soldiers in rogue "kill team" with murdered civilian.
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2011 10:27

Der Spiegel newspaper has published three photographs on Sunday depicting US army soldiers posing with a dead Afghan civilian, as well as two other unarmed civilians allegedly murdered by the same army squad.

The photographs are among roughly 4,000 images and videos uncovered by the German newspaper.

The two men reportedly shown in the photographs, Private Andrew Holmes and Specialist Jeremy Morlock, were allegedly part of a rogue 12-man "kill team".

The Spiegel published the photographs online behind a paywall, but the website Public Intelligence reproduced them. They are shown below. Please note they depict bloodied corpses, though the faces have been blurred.

A man reported by Der Spiegel to be Private Andrew Holmes poses with Gul Mudin, an unarmed Afghan man killed by Holmes' unit on January 15, 2010. Holmes faces murder charges in military court for Mudin's death.

A man reported by Der Spiegel to be Specialist Jeremy Morlock poses with Gul Mudin, an unarmed Afghan man killed by Morlock's unit on January 15, 2010. Morlock has pled guilty to three counts of murder and was scheduled to be sentenced on March 23, 2011.

Two unarmed Afghan civilians reportedly murdered by a squad of US army soldiers in 2010. The 12-man group has been accused of killing Afghan civilians for sport, smoking hashish, and beating a fellow soldier to intimidate him into keeping quiet about their actions.
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