[QODLink]
Central & South Asia
Pakistan army to investigate video
Footage of troops apparently shooting bound and blindfolded civilians in Swat region prompts inquiry.
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2010 08:58 GMT
The video at the centre of the army investigation purports to show Pakistani soldiers killing bound and blindfolded men

General Ashfaq Kayani, Pakistan's army chief, has ordered an investigation into a video posted on the internet showing men in Pakistani military fatigues shooting at a group of what the military said were civilians.

The video raised fresh questions about alleged extra-judicial killings by the army, while Pakistan faces mounting US pressure to crack down harder on suspected Pakistani fighters launching attacks on Western forces in Afghanistan.

Kayani said on Friday that part of the inquiry's mission was to determine whether those shown in uniform were actually soldiers.

An organisation called the International Pashtuns' Association posted the video on Facebook , saying that the incident took place during the military's crackdown on the Pakistani Taliban in the Swat valley in the summer of 2009.

US officials said that they had asked Pakistan for information about the video purporting to show Pakistani troops lined up in a firing squad shooting bound and blindfolded men in traditional Pakistani clothing.

Human rights groups say the video fits in with "credible allegations" they have received about the conduct of Pakistani troops. The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan said in June that 282 extra-judicial killings by the army had taken place in the Swat region in the past year.

Pakistan denied the allegations.

Further evidence

Amnesty International, the London-based rights campaigner, told Al Jazeera last week that while it could not confirm the authenticity of the video, it had "received credible reports of suspected insurgents being summarily executed by the Pakistani security forces in Pakistan's Swat valley".

"It is not expected of a professional army to engage in excesses against the people whom it is trying to guard against the scourge of terrorism," Kayani was quoted saying.

"(It is) unacceptable under any circumstances."

Kayani cautioned against "reaching hasty conclusion" as previously fighters had disguised themselves as soldiers during a number of attacks including one on military headquarters in the city of Rawalpindi last year.

If confirmed, the video could raise a legal headache for the US, which is bound by law not to give military aid and assistance to foreign armies found to have committed gross human rights violations.

Considered a crucial partner in the efforts to defeat the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Pakistan and Afghanistan, the Pakistani military has received $10bn from Washington since 2001, when the Taliban were overthrown by a US-led multinational force.

The US state department described the images as "horrifying," and has said that the issue will be raised with the Pakistani government by Anne Patterson, the US ambassador to Pakistan.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
The past isn't far away for a people exiled from Crimea by Russia and the decades it took to get home.
join our mailing list