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Central & South Asia
Fourth Pakistan cricketer summoned
Wahab Riaz to be questioned by police in relation to the spot fixing allegations.
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2010 17:57 GMT
Wahab Riaz, left, to be questioned by police over spot fixing allegations in which team mate
Muhammad Aamir is already involved [GALLO/GETTY].

Wahab Riaz, Pakistan fast bowler, will be questioned by police in relation to the spot fixing allegations that surfaced during the final test match between Pakistan and England. 

Ijaz Butt, chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) said this at a news conference on Thursday.

"We have allowed him to be interviewed and made him available as we believe in fully cooperating with the ongoing investigations," Butt said.

The 25 year old left-armer had an impressive debut in Pakistan's only win against England at The Oval when he took five wickets in the first innings.

He played the first of the two twenty-twenty matched and is also in Pakistan's one-day squad for the five-match series which starts in Durham on Friday.

The three Pakistan players originally at the centre of the controversy Salman Butt, Muhammad Asif and Muhammad Amir were dropped from the national squad after the test series against England following allegations of spot-fixing.

They have since then been provisionally suspended by the International Cricket Council (ICC), pending investigations.

Ijaz Butt said the PCB had asked Scotland Yard and the ICC to allow the three suspended Pakistan cricketers to return home from the tour of England. He said that the PCB has assured the investigators that the cricketers would be made available for questioning when required.

Butt said that police have not yet shared any "incriminating material with the PCB'' from their investigation against the Pakistan players.

"They have not charged any of our players and I would like the suspended players to travel back to Pakistan within the next few days.''

Source:
Agencies
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