[QODLink]
Central & South Asia
Pakistan cricket trio head home
Three suspended cricketers questioned by British authorities over spot-fixing allegations fly home.
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2010 13:35 GMT
Salman Butt is one of three players who remain suspended by the International Cricket Council [EPA]

Three suspended Pakistan cricketers questioned by British authorities over spot-fixing allegations are on their way home, police have said.

Test captain Salman Butt and bowlers Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir were released without charge last week after being questioned by police over the allegations, but remain suspended by the International Cricket Council.

The trio have promised to return to England when requested to assist with the investigation.

The law firm representing the players said they would "remain available to co-operate fully with the police investigation and have each given undertakings to return to the UK if required to do so".

The three players are at the centre of a fixing scandal that erupted two weeks ago when a British tabloid alleged that they accepted money to bowl deliberate no-balls at predetermined points during the fourth test against England.

Butt, Asif and Amir asked to be left out of Pakistan's remaining tour matches against England but were still suspended by the ICC.

A fourth player, Wahab Riaz, is to be questioned by police next week in relation to allegations of corruption.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.