[QODLink]
Central & South Asia
Profile: Roza Otunbayeva
Former foreign minister is claiming to be Kyrgyzstan's interim leader.
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2010 11:59 GMT
Otunbayeva is a a previous ally of Bakiyev, who has fled the capital [Reuters]

Roza Otunbayeva, a former foreign minister, is claiming to be Kyrgyzstan's interim leader after clashes between government troops and protesters left at least 75 people dead and forced Kurmanbek Bakiyev, the president, to flee the capital.

"The interim government will remain in place for half a year, during which we will draft the constitution and create conditions for free and fair elections," Otunbayeva said on Thursday.

Otunbayeva is widely viewed as having presidential ambitions.

She is an articulate politician who helped steer the ex-Soviet republic's 2005 Tulip Revolution which ousted Askar Akayev, the previous president, and brought Bakiyev to power.

Ally-turned-foe

The 59-year-old former career diplomat served as foreign minister in the 1990s under Akayev but broke with him in 2004 to join the opposition movement.

in depth

 

  Profile: Roza Otunbayeva
  Videos:
  Opposition usurps power in Bishkek
  Kyrgyzstan: Central Asia keystone

Her Ata-Jurt party was one of the main opposition groups behind the Tulip Revolution.

Otunbayeva briefly went on to serve as acting foreign minister under Bakiyev but failed to gain approval from parliament deputies for the post.

She later became highly critical of Bakiyev, saying that his government continued the corruption and nepotism of the previous president.

The Moscow-educated Otunbayeva is believed to have close ties to the Kremlin, which she thanked for its support in her first press conference as interim leader.

As a woman, Otunbayeva is an unusual figure in Central Asia, where there are few female politicians in senior posts.

In 2007, she became a deputy for the opposition Social Democratic party.

She is a former ambassador to both the United States and Britain.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.