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Central & South Asia
Russia rejects ex-Kyrgyz head claim
Bakiyev's claim to be president dismissed, after interim government calls elections.
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 12:04 GMT
Bakiyev said that he did not recognise his own resignation, made after fleeing the country [EPA]

Russia has rejected an apparent attempt by Kurmanbek Bakiyev, Kyrgyzstan's ousted leader, to retract his resignation from office.

Sergei Lavrov, the Russian foreign minister, said during a news conference on Thursday that Bakiyev is not the president of Kyrgyzstan, despite his claims to the contrary.

He said Bakiyev had faxed his resignation to Bishkek, the Kyrgyz capital, "so this document cannot be rejected by a verbal statement".

On Wednesday, Bakiyev, speaking from Minsk, the Belarusian capital, said that he did not recognise his own resignation. He called on international officials not to acknowledge the country's new leaders that came into power after an April 7 uprising.

Bakiyev's statement came on the same day that the interim government set parliamentary elections for October 10, with the potential for presidential polls on the same date.

No presidential immunity

in depth

 

  Profile: Roza Otunbayeva
  Interview: Kurmanbek Bakiyev
  People&Power: Revolution gone wrong
 

 

  Inside Story
  Russia's growing influence
  Behind Kyrgyzstan's unrest
   
 

Videos:

  Ousted Kyrgyz leader seeks UN help
  Kyrgyzstan mourns victims of unrest
  Kyrgyz citizens look for land
  Bakiyev calls for protest probe
 

Roots of Kyrgyz uprising persist

 

Interview: Roza Otunbayeva

The polls will come after a referendum on constitutional change on June 27 aimed at reducing the powers of the president by creating a parliamentary republic with strong checks and balances.

Omurbek Tekebayev, a deputy prime minister who is in charge of constitutional reform, said on national television: "A referendum will take place on June 27 and parliamentary elections on October 10, possibly jointly presidential."

"The government has approved the timetable.

"In the new draft, the state and political system will be set up to prevent concentration of power in one hand.

"The president will lose his immunity and his family will not be subsidised by the state. The head of state will live on his own salary."

The proposed constitution will also limit to 50 the number of seats one party is allowed to hold in the 90-seat parliament.

The interim government has accused Bakiyev and his allies of election fraud last year and widespread corruption. His Ak-Zol party dominated the last parliament.

US base

The Central Asian state's new government has also accused the former leader of ordering the shooting of protesters during the April unrest, that led to the deaths of 85 people.

A senior interim official also said on Thursday that a decision on whether to allow the US to keep an air base in the country, used to support operations in Afghanistan, will not be taken until after the elections.

Roza Otunbayeva, the head of the interim government, said last week that Bakiyev had submitted his resignation in a hand-written letter faxed to the capital, Bishkek.

Otunbayeva read portions of the letter in a televised address to the nation last Friday.

The day before Bakiyev had fled to neighbouring Kazakhstan, ending days of turmoil.

The interim government has said that Bakiyev will face trial for his alleged crimes.

Source:
Agencies
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