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Central & South Asia
Deaths in Peshawar press club blast
Several people wounded in addition to deaths in suicide bombing in northwestern Pakistan.
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2009 17:26 GMT

The force of the blast blew out the windows of the press club and damaged vehicles nearby [EPA]

Three people have been killed and several others injured after a suicide bomber attacked a club for journalists in Pakistan's northwestern city of Peshawar.

The attacker blew himself up on Tuesday when stopped by police, an official said.

"It was a suicide attack. The bomber wanted to get into the Press club and when our police guard stopped him he blew himself up," Liaqat Ali Khan, a city police chief, was quoted by the Reuters news agency as saying.

The city's main Lady Reading Hospital said the victims included a policeman and a press club employee.

"We have received two dead bodies and 12 injured, including one woman," Zafar Iqbal, a doctor at the hospital, was quoted by the AFP news agency as saying.

The dead included the officer and an accountant who worked for the press club, authorities said.

A woman who was at the site died of cardiac arrest caused by the shock of the bombing, Sahib Gul, another doctor, said.

The force of the explosion blew out the windows in the red brick press club building, damaging the guard hut outside and nearby vehicles.

Peshawar has been a frequent target for bomb blasts.

Pakistan has seen a series of attacks across the country in recent months, attributed to fighters retaliating to the army's offensive against the Taliban in the South Waziristan tribal region.

Source:
Agencies
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