The meeting between Qureshi and Krishna, on September 26, will be preceded by talks between their foreign secretaries, or most senior diplomats.

Krishna's comments came just hours after Pakistani police said Saeed would be arrested for propagating jihad and collecting funds for a charity he heads.

"We hope to arrest him soon," Hafiz Mohammad Irfan, a senior police official in Faisalabad, told the Reuters news agency.

Under pressure

Police in the city of Faisalabad lodged two complaints against Saeed this week for delivering a speech to his supporters last month in which he urged jihad, or holy war, and appealed for funds for his Jamaat-ud-Dawa charity.

A spokesman for Saeed said that authorities were acting under pressure from India.

India has been demanding action against Saeed and other Pakistan-based fighters before it will resume a formal peace process, broken off by New Delhi after the Mumbai attack.

Speaking in London, Asif Ali Zardari, the Pakistani president, said Islamabad was seeking a co-operative relationship with India and reiterated Pakistan's call for a resumption of formal peace talks.

He declined to go into details on Saeed, but said the action against him showed "our determination to prosecute anyone who is inclined towards an aggressive mindset.

P Chidambaram, the Indian home minister, told an Indian news channel that even if Saeed were arrested on another charge, it would represent "significant progress" if Pakistan used this as an opportunity to question him about the Mumbai attack.