Death toll rises from Cyclone Aila

Thousands are left homeless after storm sweeps over eastern India and Bangladesh.

    Thousands of people have been left homeless by floods across eastern India and Bangladesh [AFP]

    Defences breached

    Tens of thousands of people were left homeless after their homes were swamped by the deluge, Prothom Alo, a Bangladeshi newspaper, said.

    Two-metre-high waves have breached flood defences across the country's coastal region, which lies about 135km southwest of Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, Prothom Alo said.

    The cyclone had packed winds of up to 100kph before it began to weaken.

    Authorities in West Bengal restored train and air services and reopened schools in most parts of the state on Tuesday, Indian officials said.

    Several rivers burst their banks inside the Sundarbans Tiger Reserve at the height of the cyclone, said Khalil Ahmed, the area's district magistrate.

    It was difficult to assess how the storm and flooding has affected the tiger population in the region as water levels were too high for ecologists and forest officials to survey the area, said Mrinal Chatterjee, the project director of the Institute of Nature Lovers and Climbers, an environmental group.

    About 250 tigers are estimated to live in the Indian side of the Sundarbans reserve, with another 250 thought to reside in the Bangladeshi side of the conservation area.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    Why Jerusalem is not the capital of Israel

    No country in the world recognises Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    North Korea's nuclear weapons: Here is what we know

    North Korea's nuclear weapons