"I'd also like Scotland Yard [British investigators] to help us, and I have already sought UN support."

Nearly 670 BDR guards were under arrest, she said.

The prime minister's order came as security forces and emergency relief teams continued their search for bodies at the BDR headquarters.

The corpses of army officers at the compound, including the base's chief and his wife, were found buried in mass graves and stuffed down drains following the revolt.

Search continues
 
At least 70 officers remain missing after last Thursday's 33-hour mutiny, in which 9,000 guards rose up against their army leaders.

In video

Search for Bangladesh missing officers goes on

The guards' revolt against senior officers, reportedly launched over poor pay and conditions, ended after Hasina met a group of BDR troops and threatened to put down the revolt by force.

Hasina initially said that those who surrendered during the siege would be granted amnesty, but she later said those who committed murder would face punishment.

Those found guilty of plotting the revolt would be hanged, said Nabojit Khisa, a police station chief in Dhaka.

'Guilty to be hanged'

Several hundred soldiers have reported to the BDR headquarters in Dhaka, after a deadline was set for them to return to barracks.

In depth



 Focus: Mutiny reveals chaos
 Gallery: The Rifles' revolt
 Country profile: Bangladesh

"I've been in hiding for four days because I was worried about the consequences of this … I am stunned at how barbaric the killings were. When I heard gunshots I fled out the door in civilian dress," Hossain, a BDR guard, told the AFP news agency.

Syed Ashraful Islam, a local government minister, said that a special tribunal would be set up to try the accused.

The mutiny was apparently sparked soon after army officers rejected appeals for the BDR guards to have increases in pay, food subsidies and holidays.