Tension as Karzai meets US envoy

Afghan president to meet Richard Holbrooke amid speculation over his leadership.

    Holbrooke will meet Karzai only after holding talks with senior Afghan security officials [AFP]

    "We are negotiating ... I had to campaign for an end to civilian casualties because we are a sovereign country and the Afghan people expect their government to stand for them."

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    Hamish MacDonald, reporting for Al Jazeera from Kabul, noted that Holbrooke, the US representative to Pakistan and Afghanistan, has insisted on holding talks with senior Afghan security officials before meeting Karzai since his arrival on Thursday.

    The US special representative himself has previously criticised Karzai's government as "weak", "corrupt" and suffering from "thin leadership".

    "Quite clearly they don't seem to be a fan of president Karzai, they don't seem to approve of what he is doing in terms of trying to crack down on the drugs trade, in trying to crack down on the Taliban," MacDonald said.

    "We have already heard reports that they have flown a number of potential replacements into Washington to talk about what they would do if they took over the presidency," he said.

    Afghan deployment

    Obama is expected to approve the deployment of about 30,000 extra US troops to Afghanistan in the next few days, despite fears in some circles that the mistakes of the Soviet Union's 1979-89 invasion of the country, when much of the general Afghan population joined the fight against Russian forces, are being repeated.

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    The deployment is seen as vital for securing presidential elections - only the second in Afghanistan's history - set for August 20 after they were postponed for three months amid security concerns.

    There are fears that the security situation is deteriorating in and around Kabul after the Taliban launched one of their most audacious raids on the city to date on Wednesday, killing 20 people in a co-ordinated assault on three government buildings.

    Kabul says most of the opposition fighters are based in Pakistan's remote tribal regions to the east of Afghanistan.

    Holbrooke could ask officials why they cannot even secure government infrastructure in Kabul, MacDonald said.

    "This is clearly something Holbrooke will be thinking of as he is not only responsible for Afghanistan, as far as the US is concerned, but also for Pakistan.

    Nato reluctance

    There are now 80,000 US and Nato soldiers in the country, backed up by the Afghan army and police.

    Karzai said that civilian casualties in US-led operation had created tensions [AFP]
    But most Nato nations are reluctant to contribute more; they also do not want their forces in a frontline role.

    In Washington on Thursday, Al Jazeera's Anand Naidoo asked Robert Wood, the US state department spokesman, if the planned US deployment was likely to go ahead.

    "The president has made it very clear that Afghanistan is going to be a priority and that we need to do more in terms of fighting the Taliban," Wood said.

    Xenia Dormandy, a former South Asia section head at the US National Security Council, told Al Jazeera: "There is a debate because they truly do not know what the border Afghan policy is going to be over the coming years.

    "They are still trying to decide what are going to be the objectives over the next year to two years. And until the new administration comes up with these new objectives, the question of how many forces and how much US forces you need is very much up in the air."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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