"I have no intention of leaving the country and will stay in Nepal and contribute to the independence and prosperity of the Nepali nation," he said at his first ever news conference at the Narayanhity royal palace.
 
"I have accepted the decision,'" he told reporters, referring to the abolition of the monachy.

Assembly decision

Gyanendra said he accepted the assembly's verdict to abolish the monarchy and had already handed over the royal crown and a ceremonial sceptre to the government.

"I have no intention of leaving the country and will stay in Nepal and contribute to the independence and prosperity of the Nepali nation"

Gyanendra, former Nepali king
The decision to abolish the world's only Hindu monarchy was taken last month by an assembly formed as part of a peace deal between Maoist fighters and mainstream parties which joined forces to oppose Gyanendra after he seized direct control of the country.
 
Gyanendra was vaulted to the throne in June 2001 after a palace massacre in which most of the royal family was killed.
 
The shooting rampage was staged by the then-crown prince who was drunk and on drugs and enraged at being prevented from marrying the woman he loved. He later killed himself.

The former king, who was regarded as a god by devout Hindus, showed no emotion as he drove away in a small convoy of three vehicles.
 
Some Nepalis have objected to Gyanendra's move to his new residence, known as the Nagarjun palace.
 
Earlier, more than 100 people gathered outside the venue of the constituent assembly meeting to demand Gyanendra not be allowed to live at his former hunting resort, which was taken over by the government last year.
 
"Give alms, not palace, to the beggar," some protest placards read.
 
In another demonstration, about 300 people demanded that Nepal, which has officially been a secular state since 2006, be made a Hindu nation once again.