Protests in Pakistan over relief

Rescuers struggling to reach remote communities cut off by severe floods.

    Six Pakistanis have been wounded during protests including a police chief [AFP]

    A cyclone struck Baluchistan, Pakistan's southwest province on Tuesday, three days after a storm destroyed Karachi, the nation's biggest city, killing around 230 people.

     

    Homeless

    Khuda Bakhsh Baluch, the relief commissioner for Baluchistan province, said 1.1 million people were now known to have been affected by the cyclone.

     

    He said around 250,000 of them have been made homeless.

     

    Floods submerged four districts and inundated three others causing severe damage to roads, bridges, railway lines and even severed a natural gas pipeline.

     

    The death toll from the cyclone and flooding in Pakistan has risen to about 60.

     

    Witnesses in the town of Turbat, near the Iranian border, said police fired teargas to break up a protesters who raided a government agency and the office of a pro-government party.

     

    Qambar Baloch, one witness, said: "The people are complaining that they're not getting relief assistance."

     

    Cut off

     

    Meanwhile Baluchistan's relief commissioner said the main problem he faced was getting help to the tens of thousands of people cut off by floods.

     

    Police officers fired teargas and bullets
    at angry

    protesters [AFP]

    "It rained throughout the province last night, but this is the normal monsoon. The worry now is not rain. The main problem is communication," Baluch said.

     

    A fleet of aircraft, including more than a dozen military helicopters and several C-130 cargo aircraft, were called in but the rain hindered their flight.

     

    "We're considering flying C-130s to areas which have airports. We'll dump relief goods and from there they'll be distributed, but many areas don't have airports," Baluch said.

     

    Across the border in Afghanistan, heavy rain caused widespread flooding that has killed more than 40 people, destroyed roads and damaged homes and irrigation systems.

     

    In India, tens of thousands of people on the east coast were clearing out of the path of a storm approaching from the Bay of Bengal, officials said.

     

    "The storm is very close to Puri town on the Orissa coast and is likely to cross over the mainland any time," said L.V. Prasad Rao, director of a cyclone warning centre.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.