Bhutan paper appeals for aid

A newspaper run by refugees in Nepal seeks overseas assistance to keep going.

    A 1989 royal decree mandated that antennas
    be dismantled, blocking foreign television

    The newspaper is uploaded on to the internet but the majority of refugees in the camps are not able to get it because they are not online.

     

    Access to information

     

    TP Mishra, the paper's editor, said publishing hard copies of the newspaper was the best way to reach its target audience.

     

    Bhutan: The ancient kingdom

    Located between China and India

     

    About 100,000 Bhutanese live in seven UN Refugees camps in Nepal.

     

    Many are ethnic Nepali who had migrated to Bhutan but were then forced out, leaving them stateless and stranded for nearly 20 years

     

    One government newspaper, The Kuensel, and two private papers, one government-owned television station and several radio stations.

    Until the early 1990s, there was no local television station.

     

    A 1989 royal decree mandated that antennas be dismantled, in effect blocking foreign television.

    "We need to find a way to ensure

    that the people living in the refugee camps, especially those who do not have internet access, can still exercise their right to information."

     

    He said it was important the paper survived.

     

    "The media situation inside Bhutan is strictly under government threat.

    "Organisations like APFA-Bhutan, established in the refugee camps, are trying to bring Bhutan's suppressed media in the international arena."
     

     

    Staff members at the paper say that 2,000 Nepalese rupees would be enough to ensure the paper continues to print each month while 14,000 rupees could turn it into a weekly publication.

    For more information click here to visit the Media Helping Media website

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Can Muslim leaders alter Trump's Jerusalem decision?

    Can Muslim leaders alter Trump's Jerusalem decision?

    Turkish president calls Jerusalem a 'red line' as he hosts an Organisation of Islamic Cooperation summit in Istanbul.

    'Beaten' Palestinian boy in viral photo charged

    'Beaten' Palestinian boy in viral photo charged

    Fawzi al-Junaidi, 16, denies accusations of throwing stones and protesting, saying he was severely beaten by Israelis.

    Donald Trump: A president swallowed by history

    Donald Trump: A president swallowed by history

    The US has tried and failed to create a capital for another state before. "Israeli" Jerusalem will be the next Saigon.