Peshawar blast kills 10

Most of the victims are police and municipal officials.

    The blast occured close to both a Sunni mosque and
    a Shia community centre [AFP] 


    Sayed Qainul Hassan, who runs the community centre, said: "When they went out there was an explosion. It terrified us, the noise was deafening."
     
    Kamal Hyder, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Pakistan, reported that a small explosion had occurred, bringing officials to the scene when there was a second, larger blast.
     
    He said: "Security forces were already on high alert and the suspicion is that this was an organised sectarian attack, but we cannot confirm that at this time."
     
    He said that no one had yet claimed responsibility for the blast, which comes just a few days before the Muslim feast of Ashura.
     
    Fazal Wadood, an area police official, said ambulances were attending the scene.
     
    He said most of the wounded were police who were providing security outside the mosque.
     
    Mohammed Ali Durrani, Pakistan's information minister, condemned the attack, saying it had been orchestrated by the "enemies of Pakistan, Islam and humanity".
     
    While Pakistani Shia and Sunni communities usually co-exist peacefully, groups on both sides are blamed for sectarian attacks.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.