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China dismisses UN report on N Korea 'crimes'

Beijing says UN report published last month alleging crimes against humanity in North Korea made unfounded accusations.

Last updated: 17 Mar 2014 18:00
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China has dismissed a UN report alleging that North Korea has committed crimes against humanity, raising fears among human rights activists that it will shield its ally Pyongyang from international prosecution.

Chen Chuandong, a member of China's mission in Geneva, told the UN Human Rights Council on Monday that the independent commission of inquiry made unfounded accusations and made recommendations that were "divorced from reality".

The report, published in February, accused the country of killings and torture comparable to Nazi-era atrocities and said officials, possibly even Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un himself, should face the International Criminal Court (ICC). 

"The inability of the commission to get support and cooperation from the country concerned makes it impossible for the commission to carry out its mandate in an impartial, objective and effective manner," Chen said.

China, as a member of the UN Security Council, would have the power to veto any move to refer North Korea to the Hague-based ICC,

Diplomats had already warned China was likely to object to the report, which also criticised Beijing for its treatment of North Korean defectors, the Reuters news agency reported.

'Hostile forces'

The chief author of the report, retired Australian judge Michael Kirby, had opened the debate by challenging the UN to act to stop crimes against humanity that he said ranked among the worst in modern history.

"Contending with the scourges of Nazism, apartheid, the Khmer Rouge and other affronts required courage by great nations and ordinary human beings alike," Kirby said. 

"It is now your solemn duty to address the scourge of human rights violations and crimes against humanity in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea."

Kirby said the team's findings, based on testimony from hundreds of victims, defectors and witnesses, were unequivocal, and demanded closure of political prison camps believed to hold up to 120,000 people, Reuters reported.

Chen said the report was based on information and interviews collected outside the country, without first hand information. 

"The question then arises can such an inquiry be truly credible?" he said.

So Se Pyong, North Koreas ambassador to the UN, reiterated Pyongyang's rejection of the report, describing it as a provocation instigated by the US and other "hostile forces," who he said should be investigated for their own human rights records.

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