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China takes Japan shrine dispute to UN

China's envoy to UN tells Japanese PM to correct "erroneous outlook" of history after his visit to shrine for war dead.

Last updated: 09 Jan 2014 01:49
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South Koreans protested after Abe's visit to the shrine [AP]

China has taken its feud with Japan to the UN, questioning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's "erroneous outlook" on history after he visited a shrine commemorating former leaders convicted as war criminals.

Abe's December 26 visit to Tokyo's Yasukuni Shrine infuriated China and South Korea and prompted concern from the United States.

"It all boils down to whether the leader of a country should stand on the side of maintaining the principles and purposes of the charter of the UN or to side with war criminals," China's UN envoy Liu Jieyi said on Wednesday.

Both China and Korea suffered under brutal Japanese rule, with parts of China occupied in the 1930s and Korea colonised from 1910 to 1945.

The Yasukuni shrine commemorates Japanese leaders who were convicted of war crimes after the end of World War Two, among others.

"The question inevitably arises as to what Abe is up to, where does he intend to take his country?" Liu said.

"The international community should remain vigilant and issue a warning ... that Abe must correct his erroneous outlook of history, he must correct his mistakes and he must not slip further down the wrong path," he said.

Japan's UN ambassador, Motohide Yoshikawa, said in a statement that Abe's visit to the shrine was not to pay homage to war criminals or praise militarism.

"Abe visited Yasukuni Shrine to pay his respects and pray for the souls of the war dead and renew the pledge that Japan shall never again wage war. It was nothing more and nothing less," Yoshikawa said.

Ties between Japan and China were already strained due to a simmering row over ownership of a group of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea. China has said it is willing to talk to Japan about the issue but has accused Abe of not being serious about wanting to resolve the dispute.

In the spat over Abe's shrine visit, the Chinese and Japanese envoys to London both wrote columns in Britain's Daily Telegraph newspaper in the past week likening each other to Lord Voldemort, the villain in the Harry Potter.

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