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Typhoon Son-Tinh kills dozens in Philippines
Death toll rises to 24 as storm causes drowning from flash floods and landslides in central islands and far south.
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2012 02:40
Typhoon Son-Tinh has battered more than 30 provinces in the central, eastern and southern Philippines [EPA]

The death toll from Typhoon Son-Tinh in the Philippines has risen sharply to 24, as casualty reports come in from isolated central islands and the far-flung south, the government said.

Drowning and landslides were given as the cause of 11 deaths on small islands in the country's mid-section, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said in its latest tally on Saturday.

The other 13 victims were carried away by flash floods, buried by landslides, hit by falling trees and flying debris, electrocuted, or died from exposure to the cold, it added.

The official death toll from the typhoon, which was classed as a weaker "tropical storm" when it passed over the Philippines, had previously stood at six on Friday.

Eight fishermen from the central and southern Philippines remained missing at sea, the government agency said.

Rescuers are also still searching for a man believed buried in a landslide on the main southern island of Mindanao, it said, adding that more than 15,000 people displaced by the storm were still sheltering at government buildings and receiving disaster aid.

Food and other forms of aid were given to nearly 40,000 others who chose to remain at home or temporarily moved in with relatives or friends, it added.

The Philippines endures about 20 major storms or typhoons each year that occur mainly during the rainy season between June and October.

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