Cheap imports worry Indonesian soy farmers

A lack of training and technology means the country has become dependent on imports, worrying food security experts.


    Indonesia was self-sufficient in food production before it opened its economy in the late 1990s. Now farmers say they are being squeezed by cheap imports from abroad and the country is unable to meet its domestic food consumption needs.

    Currently, Indonesia produces only 30 per cent of the soy beans it consumes. The government wants to be self-sufficent in soy production in two years, but critics say meeting that target will be unlikely.

    In order to be able to feed itself, Indonesia needs to improve its training for farmers, while providing them with better access to technology, analysts say.

    Al Jazeera's Step Vassen from West Java. 

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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